Kobe earthquake 2 (1995)


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The ground floor of this building, whose upper section is adequately reinforced, has collapsed. Picture: Kobe earthquake, Hanshin (1), BWG 1995

These steel frames suffered extensive permanent deformation. Picture: Kobe earthquake, Hanshin (12), BWG 1995

Thanks to the use of special flexible mounting components for the façade elements, the glass façade of a new skyscraper survived a strong earthquake practically unscathed. Picture: Kobe earthquake, Hanshin (14), BWG 1995

This office building had a continuous fireproof wall on the right back side and additional eccentric reinforcement at the back. The building warped significantly and the front piers failed as a result. Picture: Kobe earthquake, Hanshin (18), BWG 1995

An upper floor of this building collapsed. The section above it sagged, it then twisted somewhat and tilted forward. Picture: Kobe earthquake, Hanshin (19), BWG 1995

The corner of this building collapsed. Picture: Kobe earthquake, Hanshin (15), BWG 1995

Kobe Japan 1995. Picture: Kobe earthquake, Hanshin (13), BWG 1995

Filing cabinets can overturn, especially if the wheel drawers are not secured. Picture: Kobe earthquake, Hanshin (16), BWG 1995

Filing cabinets can overturn, especially if the wheel drawers are not secured. Picture: Kobe earthquake, Hanshin (17), BWG 1995


The Great Hansin earthquake occured in Kobe, Japan, on 17 January 1995. The earth shook for around 20 seconds and the tremors reached a level of 7.3 on the Japanese JMA magnitude scale. The earthquake claimed the lives of 6,434 people and reduced over 100,000 buildings to rubble. A five-kilometre stretch of the Hanshin motorway viaduct also collapsed.

 

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